Funeral flowers have been used and displayed in funerals in various ways for many years. The display of funeral flowers in some shape or form in a funeral ceremony is generally a traditional and preferred option and it’s easy to understand why. Flowers undoubtedly signify beauty, the joy of love and life everlasting. In fact, ancient burial sites thousands of years old have been located with evidence of flower fragments next to the grave site, suggesting our modern use of flowers is not something new. Understandably, masses of flowers and spices were also commonly placed in years gone by to keep the air smelling sweet and fresh.
Almost everyone enjoys flowers and can’t help but feel uplifted by their presence. What’s not to love about roses (my all time favourite), carnations, chrysanthemums, lisianthus, daffodils, gardenias, gerberas, iris, tulips, lilies and more!
The red poppy, often incorporated with a sprig of rosemary holds special significance for Australians, with the poppy being accepted and recognised as the Emblem of Remembrance. Worn on Remembrance day each year, the red poppies were among the first to flower in war torn battlefields in the first world war, and now play a significant part in many funerals.
Funeral FlowersThere appears to be a growing trend for families to request no flowers at the funeral of their loved one, often with a preference to request donations to a charitable organisation; and how wonderful that thousands of dollars are being raised as a result. Funeral directors however will usually encourage families to at least have what’s known as a single or double ended casket spray to adorn the top of the casket or coffin. The choices are endless and can assist in personalising a ceremony, perhaps with a chosen dominant colour or style. Single casket sprays are sometimes preferred to allow room to display other things such as photographs or special items.

Recently one of our talented florists put together a stunning arrangement of black roses and bright yellow gerberas, keeping the Richmond supporters in the family happy whilst honouring the life of the deceased. I’ve heard people comment that they can’t imagine having no flowers at all at a funeral; and I’m inclined to agree. Of course like many other elements when it comes to funeral arranging; there is simply no right or wrong, in some instances with cultural or traditional preferences being a noticeable factor when it comes to the presence or absence of funeral flowers.
How about considering asking those attending to bring a flower/s from their own garden? Or a display of flowers can be skilfully arranged in a special item such as a golf or fishing bag.
As always we are here to provide support and advice for our families in making the choices that feel right for them. Please contact us at Oakdale Funerals if we can be of further assistance.